ralph lauren polo for kids AdAge Encyclopedia of Advertising

puritan polo shirts AdAge Encyclopedia of Advertising

While tailors and dressmakers have plied their trade for centuries, the modern apparel industry and its advertising only began to develop in the late 19th century. The invention of the sewing machine in 1845 made possible machine produced clothing to replace homemade items in consumers’ wardrobes. Early ready to wear apparel was aimed at low income consumers who could not afford to hire dressmakers and was advertised via store signage and trade cards that featured pictures and retail shops’ addresses. at the turn of the 21st century: Levi Strauss Co. The company’s namesake founder arrived in California with a supply of fabric to sew tents for miners but found a better use for the material making work pants. In the 1920s, responding to complaints that the rivets in its jeans scratched furniture, Levi’s engaged in its first brand advertising, promoting covered rivets

Retailers first pushed mass produced clothing onto racks and into newspaper ads, with big city department stores leading the way. John Wanamaker, a Philadelphia dry goods merchant, brought about many early innovations in retail and apparel advertising while promoting his department store.

Wanamaker’s was the first major retailer to place page ads. Mr. Wanamaker also pioneered such concepts as fixed prices and money back guarantees. He promoted those innovations in ads that departed from the simple, agate type used in newspaper ads of the time. In 1890, Mr. Wanamaker hired John E.

Men’s shoes and clothing brands were among the first advertisers in the fashion segment. New England shoemaker William L. Douglas, billed as “The Three Dollar Shoe Man,” was the first to advertise a small line of mass produced men’s shoes in the late 1800s. Niles. The account, which spent most heavily in rural weeklies to boost mail order sales, grew to $175,000 in annual spending by 1894.

Another footwear company, Red Cross Shoes, was a contributor to the development of marketing research. Stanley Resor, at the time president of J. Walter Thompson Co., sought to figure out national retail distribution patterns for his client to help manage the account. He commissioned a study that listed retailers by state and by category, a structure that became the basis of modern market research.

Arrow Shirts pioneered the use of humor in advertising in 1932 with a series of ads from Young Rubicam. Each ad used a humorous anecdote to tout a different shirt feature. The best known execution used reincarnation as the setup to promote Arrow’s shrink proof shirts. “My friend, Joe Holmes, is now a horse,” voice over said. designers and apparel brands. retailers in promoting clothing from American designers, whose names were featured in ads. Such efforts led to the rise of a generation of American designers such as Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass and Halston.

In the first half of the century, apparel advertising was mostly practical and utilitarian, focusing on product benefits. With the arrival of TV and new photographic technologies, advertising became more visual and image oriented. Photography replaced in ads, and models and celebrities began a rise to fashion icon status.

In the years after the war, legendary adman David Ogilvy at Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson Mather created a campaign called “The Man in the Hathaway Shirt. Inspired by images of Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner, Mr. Ogilvy’s ads featured an urbane, eyepatch wearing gentleman (nicknamed “The Baron”) who hunted big game, conducted orchestras and painted pictures. The campaign first began in The New Yorker in 1951 and ran for four years; it is often hailed as a milestone in “aspirational” image advertising.

Image was everything in the 1960s, when the Great Lakes Mink Association hired Trahey Advertising to create a campaign to sell its extra dark mink furs. Agency President Jane Trahey, one of the first women to run her own agency, took the group’s acronym and created the glitzy Blackglama brand. Ms. Trahey and VP Marketing Director Peter Rogers created the tagline “What becomes a legend most?” and enlisted stars such as Bette Davis, Carol Channing, Barbra Streisand and Lauren Bacall. The spare ads featured only a photo, the tagline and the Blackglama name. The campaign broke in 1968 and ran for almost three decades.

The designer jeans craze of the late 1970s was a prime example of the power of advertising to turn a utilitarian product such as blue jeans into a fashion statement by branding it as such. Jordache spent most of its $250,000 ad budget in 1978 on TV buys to air its “Jordache Look” spot. The commercial, with its catchy “You’ve got the look” jingle, projected a fun, sexy, fashionable image that made Jordache into a brand with $130 million in sales and a $9 million advertising budget by 1980.

The 1980s saw the rise of the star designer and fashion as lifestyle marketing best represented by American designers such as Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger. Lifestyles and image were to become the hallmarks of Ralph Lauren, who began his rise in the 1970s with a collection of ties made from upholstery fabrics. His company, Polo Ralph Lauren, pioneered the concept of the “lifestyle brand” in fashion, creating an all over image, from clothing and fragrance to housewares. In the 1980s, Wells, Rich, Greene and Kurtz Tarlow (later Tarlow Advertising) created ads that made the Polo brand synonymous with an upscale, preppy elegance.

Calvin Klein pushed apparel advertising to its limits. His 1980 campaign featured a teen age Brooke Shields suggestively asking the camera, “Want to know what comes between me and my Calvins? Nothing.” It was the first of many efforts from the designer to be condemned as exploitative, but it made Ms. Shields and Calvin Klein Jeans household words.

Nearly every Calvin Klein campaign since 1980 raised hackles among media watchdogs. In 1995, CRK Advertising, the designer’s in house agency, was forced to pull a jeans campaign after complaints that the TV spots too closely resembled outtakes from pornographic films. CRK also was forced to cancel a 1999 spring campaign for children’s underwear after children’s rights groups condemned b photographs of scantily attired boys as “kiddie porn.”

Not all lifestyle advertising to emerge from the 1980s, however, was suggestive or status driven. Marketers such as Kenneth Cole Productions and United Colors of Benetton made often controversial social statements with their advertising a cost. Cole’s print and outdoor ads, created largely in house, took stands on divisive issues such as gun control, abortion rights and domestic violence. In 1985, Mr. Cole was one of the first designers to draw attention to AIDS with an ad that featured a shoelace in the shape of an AIDS awareness lapel ribbon.

In 1972, Benetton, then a small Italian company selling colorful knits to the youth market, hired Milan shop Eldorado to create a poster campaign. Ten years later, Benetton began working with a photographer from Eldorado, Oliviero Toscani, who subsequently became Benetton’s creative director. Under Mr. Toscani, Benetton’s advertising in the 1980s increasingly evolved into issue oriented messages.

In the 1990s, Benetton’s advertising was even more controversial, often not featuring the marketer’s products but focusing instead on shocking images, such as a priest kissing a nun or a black woman breast feeding a white baby. The ads initially succeeded in raising the brand’s profile but eventually caused costly rifts with consumers and retailers.

Things came to a head in February 2000, when Benetton launched a series of ads featuring death row prison inmates. Within weeks of the first ads, Benetton was hit by a lawsuit from the state of Missouri, which claimed Mr. Toscani and his colleagues lied to state officials to gain access to the inmates. Sears, Roebuck Co. ended a joint venture to sell a private label line, Benetton USA, after victims’ rights groups picketed a Texas Sears store.

Even as designers and fashion brands launched their own retail outlets and department stores’ influence on fashion trends declined, some large retailers turned to fashion to reinvent themselves. Sears, for example, which had pioneered direct mail merchandising of fashion products in the late 1800s, turned to TV in 1992 to promote its “softer side.”

Some successful apparel brands in the 1990s were retailers in disguise. The Gap, Abercrombie Fitch and Victoria’s Secret combined a strong fashion sense with creative branding and savvy merchandising.

The Gap, which had begun in 1969 as a retailer of inexpensive Levi’s jeans, reinvented itself via advertising in the 1980s as a sportswear shop. Its 1988 “Individuals of Style” campaign featured celebrities such as Arthur Ashe and Miles Davis modeling simple white shirts and turtlenecks and were shot by renowned photographers such as Annie Liebowitz and Herb Ritts. In 1994, Gap revived its khaki sales with its “Who Wears Khakis?” effort, which featured art and style icons such as Gene Kelly in vintage shots.

The Gap’s parent company took over Banana Republic in 1983 and repositioned it in the early 1990s as a more upscale version of The Gap, offering sleek, sophisticated clothes. That positioning was backed with ads that reinforced the classic, fashionable brand image, usually done in house.

Old Navy, Gap’s kid brother launched in 1994, went for a more youthful, playful image in both its products and its advertising. It promoted itself with a series of kitschy ads using celebrities such as Morgan Fairchild, Joan Collins and the cast of the 1970s sitcom “The Jeffersons.”

Suggestive ads from Shahid Co. for Abercrombie Fitch featured campus streakers and nude or nearly nude couples; its controversial spring 2001 campaign featured nude men and clothed women. Each successive A campaign encountered further opposition, but each succeeded in making the brand popular with teens, who were not put off by their parents’ protestations about the marketer’s prurient promotions.
ralph lauren polo for kids AdAge Encyclopedia of Advertising

under armor polo shirts A taste of Bodegas Valdemar and Rioja

polo 1 cologne A taste of Bodegas Valdemar and Rioja

A few decades ago Spanish wines were for the most part bargain barrel wines that, although exhibiting ample fruit in their youth, were spoiled by sometimes unclean winemaking and a heavy hand with the oak. During the 1980s in an attempt to expand their export wine sales some Rioja winemakers cleaned up winemaking operations, adopted contemporary viticulture practices and throttled back the oak regimen.

Jesus Martinez Bujanda Jr. of Bodegas Valdemar was one of the key innovators in this departure from the past and pioneered what has become known as the new style of Rioja.

Bujanda, 69, is now the elder statesman for Bodegas Valdemar, and claims to be retired. Meeting with him, his daughter Ana, and son Jesus Martinez Bujanda Mora, the two siblings chuckled at their father’s comments about his work status. Retired? Hardly.

However, they exhibited their father’s infectious enthusiasm for winemaking and innovation. Reflecting on the past, the patriarch said he “felt God was with them 50 years ago” and that he was surprised that they could make decent, albeit traditional styled wine, due to the poor condition of the vineyards and cellars.

Recently, Patrick and I spent over 14 hours together in my compact Prius, when we road tripped to and from a wedding in Rhode Island in a single weekend.

It’s a good thing he and I get along, or at least won’t strangle each other when confined to a small space for long stretches of time. Though.

(Liz Murphy)

We were impressed with the wines we tasted, which did not include the single varietal wines, and agreed with the son that Bodegas Valdemar had achieved their “goal of soft and rounded wines.”

The family’s commitment to high quality wines was reinforced when Jesus Martinez Bujanda Mora said the winery sold off 70 percent of its red grape production in 2014 due to the effect of heavy rains immediately before harvest.

The following wines were our favorites from the tasting:

Conde de Valdemar Finca Alto Cantabria Rioja Blanco2013 ($18). This is made from 100 percent barrel fermented old vine (planted 1970) viura grapes. Bodegas Valdemar was the first winery in Rioja to introduce a barrel fermented viura in the mid 1980s. The wine exhibited very clean elegant apple fruit flavors with a hint of spice. Close your eyes and you would guess you were tasting a well made village white burgundy from the Macon region of France.

It isn’t hard to find Olivier Dauga in a crowd. Amid the suit coats, ties, and polo shirts,
under armor polo shirts A taste of Bodegas Valdemar and Rioja
he’s the dude with the wild shirt, bluejeans, colorful glasses and a pair of shoes that leaves one speechless. Modest, he’s not. Self confident and knowledgeable, he is.

Talk about a shoe fetish. Dauga owns.

(Tom Marquardt and Patrick Darr)

Conde de Valdemar Crianza Rioja 2010 ($16). The blend is 90 percent tempranillo and 10 percent mazuelo. It is aged in 100 percent American oak. The mazuelo provides the acidity to this soft fruity wine with ample aromatics. A nice wine for summer barbecues.

Conde de Valdemar Reserva Rioja 2007 ($26). This wine is made from 90 percent tempranillo, 5 percent mazuelo and 5 percent graciano and aged in American and French oak barrels. It is very soft in the mouth with dried cherry/ripe cherry nose and flavors, and just a hint of oak in the mouth. Amazingly, this wine has been in the bottle for 5 years before release.

Conde de Valdemar Gran Reserva Rioja 2005 ($37). Made from 85 percent tempranillo, 10 percent mazuelo and 5 percent graciano, and aged for 28 months in American and French oak barrels, this is a fine elegant wine. The French oak and dried cherry nose and flavor come together in a delicious smooth pleasing package very good.

Inspiration Valdemar Selection Rioja 2010 ($26). More modern, this Rioja exhibited very fresh fruit flavors and spicy notes. This wine was a 2013 Wine Spectator’s Top 100 wine.

The finale, however, was a return to tradition with a 1991 Conde de Valdemar Gran Reserva Rioja. We expected a similar flavor profile to an aged California Cabernet sauvignon or 20 plus year old Grand Cru French Bordeaux, but this wine was true to itself. The wine was elegance personified with still abundant fruit and a good deal of complexity. This wine makes you want to consider cellaring Gran Reserva Rioja along side your other age worthy wines.

Wine picks:

Paul Mas Estate St. Hilaire 2012 ($15). A good value in the chardonnay market, this French gem from the Languedoc exudes tropical fruit flavors and a hint of vanilla and spice.

H/H Estates Michael Andrews Red Reserve 2010 ($38). We loved this deep and textured blend of Washington state tempranillo and graciano. Jammy plum and blackberry flavors with a healthy dose of coffee. It is thick and unctuous.

Kendall Jackson Santa Maria Valley Chardonnay 2013 ($28). Reasonably priced, this full bodied chardonnay has a rich texture with ripe peach and mango flavors and a touch of sweet vanillin oak.

Patz Hall Dutton Ranch Chardonnay 2013 ($44). Once again, Patz Hall has produced a luxuriously rich chardonnay from the Russian River Valley. This gem is big in style with a fruit forward personality that is hardly shy. Melon and stone pit fruit flavors with more than a hint of oak, cinnamon and nutmeg.

Concrete Old Vine Zinfandel 2012 ($20). Rightly priced, this brambly, full throttle zin can stand up to grilled foods,
under armor polo shirts A taste of Bodegas Valdemar and Rioja
no matter how sweet the sauce or dense the meat. A little allspice joins the blackberry and vanilla flavors.

pictures of polo shirts Agony lingers as season of promise evaporates

baby polo shoes Agony lingers as season of promise evaporates

As the Green Bay Packers cleaned out their lockers Monday morning, the shock still hadn’t worn off.

If the circumstances were different, players might have been breaking down film or taking an early look at the New England Patriots. Instead, the Seattle Seahawks are the team preparing to represent the NFC in the Super Bowl.

The Packers have to live with that reality, dispatched into the darkness of the offseason following a colossal fourth quarter collapse in Sunday’s 28 22 loss at CenturyLink Field. Afterward, some players watched the film. Others said they couldn’t bear revisiting the opportunity that slipped through their grasp.

There will be no catharsis in the months to follow. The fact remains the Super Bowl will see the Lombardi Trophy contested between a team Green Bay beat (New England 26 21 on Nov. 30) and one most of the locker room feels they did Sunday.

“Anytime you feel like you should have won, it’s tough to get over,” left guard Josh Sitton said. “And when it’s the last one, it’s very difficult to get over. You feel like it’s a waste of seven, eight months. What’s the point of getting this far? I’d have rather not even made the playoffs.”

Receiver Randall Cobb found it difficult to sleep after the team returned to Green Bay late Sunday night. He doesn’t know what it’s like to win it all. The team was the healthiest it’s been in Mike McCarthy’s nine years as head coach by a wide margin. The defense wasn’t a world beater, but offseason changes finally took shortly after the bye week.

The Packers’ dynamic aerial attack had a capable rushing counterpart with Aaron Rodgers and Eddie Lacy healthy for most of the season. The offense lost some of that explosiveness when Rodgers strained his calf against Tampa Bay, but still was strong enough to topple Detroit and Dallas with the help of Lacy.

The Packers captured their fourth consecutive NFC North title after winning 12 of their last 15 games, but it still wasn’t enough to slay the Seahawks, who have won the teams’ last three meetings since 2012.

“It’s just an emotional roller coaster,” Cobb said. “I didn’t really get much sleep last night. It felt like a nightmare whenever I did fall asleep, then wake up in the middle of the night and think that things didn’t (turn out) the way they did.

“And for us to be done with the season,” said Cobb, pausing for a moment. “It’s kind of blind siding.”

It’s difficult to imagine Brandon Bostick got much rest, either.

In trying to make a play, the Packers tight end relinquished his blocking assignment and went for the ball on a Seattle onside kick in the final minutes of Sunday’s game. With Jordy Nelson steps behind him, the ball bounced free of Bostick’s hands and into the arms of Seahawks receiver Chris Matthews, who made the recovery. It’s a moment Bostick admits he continues to rehash “in his mind over and over.” Four plays later, Seattle scored to take its first lead of the game with a little more than a minute left in regulation.

“I’m human. I made a mistake,
pictures of polo shirts Agony lingers as season of promise evaporates
” Bostick said. “But if I would’ve made the play, we wouldn’t have been in this (situation) or if I would’ve made the block, we wouldn’t be talking about this. But it’s over now, so I’ll just try my best to get over it.”

Bostick, who faced the media after Sunday’s game and again Monday morning as the team cleared out of the locker room at Lambeau Field, added that he probably won’t turn on his TV for a while or watch the Super Bowl.

The former Newberry College standout said many of his teammates, including Cobb, were supportive on the sideline. Former teammates Greg Jennings and Jermichael Finley also offered words of encouragement on Twitter, helping drown out early backlash on social media.

“It definitely means a lot,” Bostick said. “I’m at a low point right now. The whole world is on my back about this thing, but my teammates are here to pick me up. They know it’s just a mistake, and they’ve been on my side.”

Like many of his teammates, Bostick said he planned to return home to South Carolina after his exit interviews wrapped up. Many say they’ll do so with knowledge the better team didn’t win Sunday. Veteran Jarrett Bush said he “feels strongly” about that.

That’s what makes the loss all the more painful.

“I’ll say 30 years from now, we’ll feel like we were a better football team than what they were (Sunday),” defensive back Micah Hyde said. “I think that’s a given. But the best team doesn’t always win.”

Sitton was one of the players who said he tried to watch the game on the four hour flight home, but just couldn’t. The hardest part for the veteran guard was seeing teammates pack up their bags. Clothes and personal items were thrown into boxes and garbage bags. Old shoes and cleats placed into collection bins for charity.

Sitton, who has two years left on his contract, will be back next year. However, others left the locker room Monday never to return. That’s how things are in the NFL. Not every one of the 73 players who ended the season under contract will be back for 2015.

Packers free agents hope to return

Eleven players are unrestricted free agents, including Cobb, fullback John Kuhn, cornerback Tramon Williams and right tackle Bryan Bulaga, Sitton’s linemate for five seasons.
pictures of polo shirts Agony lingers as season of promise evaporates

maternity polos Academic Summer Camp in Psychology

christian polo shirts Academic Summer Camp in Psychology

How much does it cost to attend?

The camp fee is $1,295. This includes lodging, meals, and activities. The number of admitted campers is limited to facilitate close contact with camp directors (two psychology professors) and additional faculty (four psychology professors), resident advisors (advanced psychology majors), and guest speakers.

Who is eligible to attend Camp Psych?

Camp Psych is designed for rising high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Is financial aid available?

Yes, we offer two to three full tuition waivers. Tuition waivers are based upon academic performance in high school and financial need. If you would like to be considered for a tuition waiver, check the appropriate box on the application form. You must submit your application by January 22 to be considered for a tuition waiver. If needed, we will contact you for additional information. Please note that the tuition waivers are competitive.

When is the application deadline?

Applications will be accepted until the camp is full and will be considered on a rolling basis. We have limited space so we recommend that you submit an application as soon as possible. We receive applications from many more qualified applicants than we can admit. Once admitted, campers will receive instructions for completing online registration. When the camp is full, registration will close.

What is the refund and cancellation policy?

Full refunds will be issued before June 1. From June 2 to June 9, there will be a 50% refund. After June 9, no refunds will be offered.

Where is check in and check out going to be?

Check in and check out will be at Hanson Hall (on West Lincoln Avenue between Washington and Carlisle Avenue, Gettysburg, PA). Parking on the street is free on Sundays. on July 20. on July 15 as camp activities will begin that afternoon.

My camper will be arriving by plane/train/bus. How do they get to campus?

provides safe and convenient transportation to/from local airports and train stations. shuttle on July 20. Due to the size of the camp, we cannot provide transportation outside these times and locations. Reservations for transportation are required. If transportation is needed, parents/guardians must arrange it for their camper. We will send a link to a website that will allow parents to complete a transportation request. Please note: To guarantee transportation for your camper, reservations must be made by June 15, 2018.

Does my camper need to do academic preparation for the camp?

No. We welcome campers with varying levels of psychological knowledge from no knowledge to extensive knowledge.

What does my camper need to bring?

We will provide linens and towels for each camper (a pillowcase, 2 towels, 2 flat sheets, and a blanket). Each room also has a micro fridge. Campers may also want to bring their own blanket or comforter and drinks and snacks to keep in their room if they would like.

What are the accommodations for campers?

Campers will live in Hanson Hall, an air conditioned dormitory. Campers will room with one or two other campers and will share bathrooms in typical dormitory style.

Who will be living with my students?

Campers will live in a college residence hall with resident advisors, psychology majors at . Resident advisors are selected based on their expertise in psychology and their maturity and experience. Resident advisors will work with students in and outside of class to support the goals of the camp and all aspects of the campers’ experiences.

Does my camper need to bring a computer?

Campers do not need to bring computers. However, campers are permitted to bring computers if they wish. Wireless access is provided in the dormitory.

Can my camper have a cellphone?

Yes. However, campers will be asked to turn off cellphones and other portable electronic devices during class sessions.
maternity polos Academic Summer Camp in Psychology

polo mallets Alaska Firefighter Shirts

grey polo hat Alaska Firefighter Shirts

Alaska firefighter shirts are a terrific way to show support for the fighting men and women who battle blazes across the nation. If you’re in Alaska, Alaska firefighter shirts are a natural. If you’re anywhere else in the world, Alaska firefighter shirts are a conversation starter. “They have fires with all that ice everywhere?” Of course they do.

Alaska Firefighter Shirts and the North Pole Fire Department

To get to the City of North Pole, Alaska you go south of Fairbanks on Route 2. About 1,600 people call the city home. Average temperature in January is negative ten degrees Fahrenheit. In July, it gets up as high as the mid 70s. It’s 27 miles to the nearest hospital (in Fairbanks). But the North Pole has a fire department all its own.

The North Pole Fire Department (NPFD) was founded in 1957. At first, the fire station was in the same building as the North Pole Police Department and North Pole City Hall. Ambulance service didn’t begin till 1975. Three firefighters were on staff in those days. EMTs were volunteers.

The City of North Pole hired a fire chief for the first time in 1977, a man by the name of Bob Fuller. Today, the department employs nine people and maintains 20 volunteers (a surprising 30 percent of them female). They handle structure fires, confined space rescues, and hazardous materials with regularity. Two big petroleum refineries are under the watch of the NPFD. Wear a shirt, show them you care.
polo mallets Alaska Firefighter Shirts

pink polo hats adaptive clothing collection from Tommy Hilfiger

embroidered polo shirt adaptive clothing collection from Tommy Hilfiger

There are three ways that you can help Talbots and O, The Oprah Magazine help others.

The two have come together to support Dress for Success, which helps women achieve their goals in work and in life. Their collaboration includes an exclusive capsule collection, parties, special events, the ultimate style experience and more.

1.

2. Clean out your closet and bring in nearly new wear to work items to Talbots stores Thursday Sunday. All items donated should be freshly dry cleaned/laundered and ironed, not more than 5 years old and suitable for wearing to job interviews.

Here are clothing items that will be accepted:3. Monetary gifts to benefit Dress for Success are welcome in stores through April 3. All donations are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

All Talbots stores nationwide are participating in the campaign. In Tulsa, Talbots is located at Woodland Hills Mall, 7021 S. Memorial Drive (918 252 2272), and in Utica Square, 1930 Utica Square (918 742 0917).

To find out how to get involved with Dress for Success, contact the local office at 1109 S.

Helping kids

American designer Tommy Hilfiger has launched a clothing line for children with disabilities in collaboration with Runway of Dreams, a nonprofit organization “working with the fashion industry to adapt mainstream clothing lines available for the differently abled community.”

The special collection of adaptive clothing addresses the challenges faced every day by the differently abled community.

The adaptive clothing features modified closures, adjustability and alternate options to get in and out of the garments.

And it all came about because Scheier’s 8 year old son wanted to wear jeans to school, she said in an interview on the website.

Her son, Oliver, has a rare form of muscular dystrophy and must wear leg braces to walk safely. Most jeans wouldn’t fit over his braces. Not wanting to tell him he couldn’t wear jeans, she told the website she spent the night altering a pair and then going to his school the next day to help him use the restroom.

“After the lengths it took to put my son in jeans for one day, I knew change had to happen,” the trained designer told the website.

The result is clothing that uses things like faux buttons with magnetic closures, bottoms crafted with velcro and MagnaReady magnet closures on the fly and pant legs and a loop/button system that makes it easy to adjust the waist and length.

The Tommy Hilfiger Adapted Clothing Collection is made up of 22 pieces for boys (sizes 4 20) and girls (sizes (4 18), she said in the interview.

“Every detail was considered so the clothing is not only functional but looks exactly the same as the TH Kids collection. They also cost the same price, which is an amazing thing.”
pink polo hats adaptive clothing collection from Tommy Hilfiger

customized polo shoes A tournament that could decide Gerhard Erasmus’ career

polo towers las vegas nv A tournament that could decide Gerhard Erasmus’ career

Imagine this scenario. You’re on strike with six runs to win off the final six balls of the match, with two wickets in hand. You’ve already been batting for just under two and a half hours trying to salvage a near hopeless situation. After the batting partner who was with you for much of that rescue mission gets out in the previous over, you decide singles aren’t an option with the No. 10 at the other end. You have to finish the job yourself.

But this is no ordinary match. No, there are far greater implications than just six runs and a win or loss at stake.

At 22, you are in your final year of university with an important life decision to make in the not too distant future. If your team wins this match, you and your team mates maintain hope of more funding for professional contracts while pursuing a spot in the World Cup and ODI status. If you lose, the team might forego that funding, resulting in amateur or at best semi pro status, and perhaps being forced to leave the game to get a job in the real world.

Oh, and your dad, who is an Associate director at the ICC, is watching from the boundary, among the few hundred hometown fans in attendance.

This is what it was like being in the shoes of Namibia batsman Gerhard Erasmus in the final moments of a tense finish on Sunday against Oman at World Cricket League Division Two in Windhoek. Which makes it all the more remarkable how clear headed he actually was while coming up with a strategy for what to do before facing the first ball of that final over from Oman medium pacer Mohammad Nadeem.

“Needing six off six, I thought I had to do it myself,” Erasmus told ESPNcricinfo after his 63 not out saw his side to a two wicket win. “I didn’t want to leave it up to the bowlers. I do have confidence in their ability but it’s my job to win it for us. The pitch was playing quite difficult from that end so it was tough to clear [the] straight [boundary]. Both men straight were back as well and the wind was blowing in from long off side.”

With fine leg up in the ring, he decided the best course of action was utilising the stiff breeze and premeditating a scoop to clear him. Hit it right and it’s an automatic four. Hit it wrong and you end up like Misbah ul Haq in the 2007 World T20 final.

“The wind is going that way, so I just thought, well, why not back myself. If I get some wood on it, I’ll back myself against a medium pacer.”

Unlike Misbah, Erasmus didn’t get too far under it to the point of the ball popping straight up in the air. But he also didn’t get the ramp angle totally right either, nailing it firmly but a bit too flat, creating a chance for the man at fine leg to reach out with fingers pointed up.

“It wasn’t close, it was very close,” Erasmus said. “He dropped it and that’s the margins in cricket. The other day against Nepal, Sarel Burger bowled a ball and it just went over mid off by [fingertips] and the left hander from Nepal [Basant Regmi] finished the game [to win by one wicket]. So that’s the margins of cricket and in a tournament like this that’s so close, you just hope and pray that the luck goes your way on the day.”

For a brief moment, while the ball was headed toward the fine leg fielder, Erasmus’ thoughts raced to what his dad would have said if the chance stuck.

“My dad doesn’t like me playing laps and sweeps like that, so I was thinking about my dad’s cross face to be honest,” Erasmus said with a grin. “And when it rattled through his hands, I was just like, ‘It’s my day and not Oman’s.’ So that’s probably a bit of luck. I think our team has been due a bit of luck. You probably create your own luck. We batted well. We probably deserved it to go for four. I still think I executed the shot correctly, so that’s that. It’s the nature of the game.”

Erasmus was equally calm and calculated in weathering the storm of left arm quick Bilal Khan’s searing spell earlier in the game. Coming around the wicket, Namibia’s right hand batsmen struggled with the angle as well as the extra pace with the wind at his back. Bilal’s burst of 5 for 11 in 12 balls, including being on a hat trick twice, wrecked Namibia’s start of 44 for 1 to leave them decimated at 65 for 7 in the 16th, chasing a target of 166.

“I think Bilal’s spell was phenomenal. Bowling around the wicket and straightening the ball, making the batsmen play all the time was absolutely phenomenal. I guess the key was then just to sort of absorb for a while, just play the ball kind of late and make the nicks go down to the ground. The pitch was moving all day. It was probably a bit of luck; some balls just passed the edge.

“The key was just to play the ball late, get in line, and hopefully it comes off and you can survive those two or three overs of Bilal’s spell, numb the attack a little bit. After the attack is numbed, 160 is probably not enough.”

That Erasmus analysed the situation quickly, realising that time was on Namibia’s side with 34 overs left if he and JJ Smit could see Bilal off, shows the maturity that has entered the 22 year old’s game. On paper, that may sound young, but Erasmus has been heralded for close to a decade as Namibia’s next great batting hope. A former Under 19 national captain, he made his senior team debut as a 15 year old against a touring MCC side in February 2011 before making a true international debut against Ireland later that year in the Intercontinental Cup.

But through his teenage years, he struggled to fulfil that promise. He finally started showing signs of being a dependable scoring option at WCL Division Two on home soil in 2015, with 241 runs at 48.20 including two half centuries. Erasmus blossomed even more at the start of the southern summer in Dubai when he was Namibia’s standout batsman against WCL Championship winners Netherlands, scoring 52 and 81 while showcasing his impressive skills against spin.

Seven years after entering the senior team, Erasmus delivered when Namibia needed him to most. When asked if he could recall a tipping point in his coming of age as a batsman, Erasmus shrugged and said it was simply down to the third word in the expression.

“I guess it’s just age,” Erasmus said. “I’ve been around the senior set up for quite a few years. I guess 16 or 17 was probably a bit too young for me. I still actually had to grow out of my shoes. It was probably too early for me. In the set up around here, I got chances quite early which in other countries I probably wouldn’t have. But I’m maturing as a batsman and rounding my own game. That’s probably the key to now getting scores that are substantial and winning matches.

“The previous Division Two tournament, I made my first sort of telling [contributions]. That might be seen as a turnaround event in my batting career. But I just put it down to age and becoming a bit older, broadening my shoulders and actually being confident now in myself.”

But just as Erasmus may be approaching his prime years, his cricket career might be closer to nearing its end. Making small talk before the cameras started rolling on his post match interviews with various outlets in attendance, Erasmus mentioned that he’s currently a fourth year law student at Stellenbosch University just east of Cape Town.

“What does that mean for your cricket career?” he was asked.

Erasmus let out a nervous laugh, and said: “What happens at this tournament might help decide that I guess.”

His father, Francois, is an Associate member representative on the ICC board and also a former president of Cricket Namibia, but his main trade is running a family law firm in Windhoek. If Namibia can’t advance to next month’s World Cup Qualifier in Zimbabwe, it might mean a professional pathway for Gerhard is no longer possible with reduced fixtures by virtue of no ODI status and possibly no place in the next edition of the WCL Championship anticipated to start in 2019.

These are the pressures Associate players are under practically every time they take the field. It’s not just win or lose a match on the day. It might be win or lose your career. That’s what makes the clear headed composure of Erasmus in the final moments of his 151 minute knock so marvellous. It’s what makes the context heavy environment of the World Cricket League the most entertaining cricket never seen on TV.

Recovering from the nail biting opening day one wicket loss to Nepal, Namibia are still very much alive in the promotion hunt at 1 1; three more matches await them at Division Two. For Erasmus, that successful scoop for four means he can also put off making a decision about continuing his career path in cricket instead of law for at least one more day.
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JOE LUMAYA/SPECIAL TO THE STAR Agoura High Schools water polo coach Dustin Litvak directs his players during a recent practice. Dustin returns as head coach after a two year absences. 9/7/2015 Agoura Hills, CA. Dustin returns as head coach after a two year absences. 9/7/2015 Agoura Hills, CA.

‘>JOE LUMAYA/SPECIAL TO THE STAR Agoura High Schools water polo coach Dustin Litvak directs his players during a recent practice. Dustin returns as head coach after a two year absences. 9/7/2015 Agoura Hills, CA.

JOE LUMAYA/SPECIAL TO THE STAR After a two year absences Dustin Litvak returns as the head coach of Agoura High Schools water polo program. 9/7/2015 Agoura Hills, CA.

JOE LUMAYA/SPECIAL TO THE STAR Agoura High Schools water polo coach Dustin Litvak shows his players the correct way he wants them to pass the ball during a recent practice. Dustin returns as head coach after a two year absences. Dustin returns as head coach after a two year absences. Dustin returns as head coach after a two year absences. 9/7/2015 Agoura Hills, CA.

JOE LUMAYA/SPECIAL TO THE STAR Agoura High Schools water polo player Ryan Reardon works with his team mates on a passing drill during a recent practice. 9/7/2015 Agoura Hills, CA.

Dustin Litvak has returned as the Agoura High boys water polo coach after a two year absence to continue the Chargers dynasty.

Litvak had a 253 61 overall record (.806) and the Chargers won seven straight Marmonte League championships from 2006 through 2012. His 2007 team was the first CIF Southern Section boys championship team for Agoura and the Chargers were also CIF champions in 2010, 2011 and 2012. The Chargers were 109 12 in 10 Marmonte League seasons.

Last year, Litvak was an assistant coach for UCLA national championship water polo team.

The No. 7 Division 1 Chargers open the season Thursday against No. 1 ranked Division 5 Claremont in the Santa Barbara Tournament.

It was two years ago, when the Chargers won their last CIF title under Peter Schiavelli, who left to be an assistant coach at his alma mater Harvard Westlake, No. 1 this season in Division 1.

Jason Rosenthal, the successful girls coach with two CIF titles and five times in the finals, stepped in last season to guide the Chargers to a CIF SS Division 1 first round playoff berth. Rosenthal coached the boys to 12 straight playoff appearances and four league titles before Litvak took the helm.

have a lot of pieces to put together, said Litvak.

Max Hartman returns for his senior season. He scored 85 goals for the Marmonte League championship team. He was a member of the CIF championship teams as a freshman and sophomore.

year our goal is to go undefeated in league, said Litvak. had 13 seniors graduate and we have a lot of new players. other schools have transfers and new coaches around the region.

Jake Ehrhardt, The Star All County Player of the Year in 2014, helped Rio Mesa win a Division 7 championship. Over the summer, the sophomore standout transferred to Oaks Christian to play for coach Jack Kocur.

Oaks Christian Jacob Watson is a sophomore transfer from Huntington Beach. Senior Gunner White and junior Matt Outcalt are returning starters.
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So far, this doesn’t appear to be a vintage ACC season. State (13 7, 3 4 as of Monday), where competitiveness has far exceeded expectations, highlighted by a league victory over then No. 2 Duke (17 2, 5 2). Boston College also has cause to savor this ACC season. The Eagles (13 7, 3 4) have won three league games, more than in the last two years combined and one short of the best season under coach Jim Christian, who arrived in 2014 15. Like Keatts’ club, the Eagles got a tremendous early boost from a home victory over Duke, the preseason national favorite.

BC is led by Jerome Robinson, a 6 5 junior guard from Raleigh. Robinson is the Eagles’ scoring leader for the second straight season and among the ACC’s top 3 point and free throw shooters. 4A championship game. But none of the ACC’s in state schools took note of Robinson, rated the 76th best shooting guard in his class according to 247 Sports yet another reason to look skeptically at recruiting ratings,
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if you need one.

Despite pundits’ pronouncements Ole Roy would never abandon an alignment stationing big men in the low post, the Tar Heels went small after consecutive road losses to Florida State (14 5, 3 4) and Virginia (18 1, 7 0) in early January. “We’re better than I thought (we would be), honestly,” says Pinson, a slender wing able to apply his considerable range of skills from a forward’s slot. “You didn’t know how quickly we would learn.” In four straight wins immediately after Williams demonstrated his adaptability, the senior with the pharaoh like goatee averaged 11 points and eight rebounds, and recorded 19 assists and five steals versus five turnovers.

Whether Virginia is overtaken by the rest of the pack or stays in front brings to mind Aesop’s fable about the tortoise and the hare. With its grinding defense and close to the vest offense, it’s easy to see which role UVa, a model of consistency, plays in the tale said to teach that slow and steady wins the race. In Aesop’s parable the hare races far ahead, only to take a nap until too late to beat the tortoise across the finish line. ACC opponents know better than to sleep on Tony Bennett’s squad.
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FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. He and his siblings Greg Golodoff and Elizabeth Kudrin are the last three surviving Attuan Aleuts of the Japanese occupation of the island. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 photo, a photo of Martha Hodikoff Woods is on display beneath her Attu family tree as Luanna Greybear collects genealogical information on the first day of the Attu Reunion at the National Park Service building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 photo, two of the last three surviving Attuan Aleuts, brothers Greg Golodoff, center, Nick Golodoff, center right, and George Kurdin, center left, representing the Golodoff’s sister, Elizabeth Kurdin, pose for a group photo on the first day of the Attu Reunion at the National Park Service building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 photo, cultural anthropologist Rachel Mason, standing center, addresses participants on the first day of the Attu Reunion at the National Park Service building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. He and his siblings Greg Golodoff and Elizabeth Kudrin are the last three surviving Attuan Aleuts of the Japanese occupation of the island. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 photo, a photo of Martha Hodikoff Woods is on display beneath her Attu family tree as Luanna Greybear collects genealogical information on the first day of the Attu Reunion at the National Park Service building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 photo, two of the last three surviving Attuan Aleuts, brothers Greg Golodoff, center, Nick Golodoff, center right, and George Kurdin, center left, representing the Golodoff’s sister, Elizabeth Kurdin, pose for a group photo on the first day of the Attu Reunion at the National Park Service building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

FOR USE SUNDAY, OCT 14 2012 AND THEREAFTER In this Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 photo, cultural anthropologist Rachel Mason, standing center, addresses participants on the first day of the Attu Reunion at the National Park Service building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association hosted the event, where survivors and descendants of survivors of the Japanese invasion and occupation if Attu are meeting some for the first time. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill) LOCAL TV OUT (KTUU TV, KTVA TV) LOCAL PRINT OUT (THE ANCHORAGE PRESS, THE ALASKA DISPATCH)

The Japanese rounded up the residents and put them under martial law. A few months later, Golodoff and 41 other Attuans were shipped to Japan as prisoners.

Half would die before they returned to America. None would ever see their village again.

Today Golodoff, his younger brother Greg and sister Elizabeth Kudrin are the last survivors of Attu, the only people alive who had homes on American soil that were occupied by a hostile force, the only living Americans to have been taken forcibly from their cou ntry by an invading army.

This week the National Park Service and Aleutian Pribilof Island Association are hosting “The Attu Reunion.” Survivors and descendants of survivors are meeting some for the first time.

Activities began on Tuesday in Anchorage as Golodoff and others looked over old photos of Attuans and tried to identify them in a race to record the village’s past before the last memories vanish.

“No one knows anything about us,” Golodoff said in an interview this week. . “That’s why I wrote the book.”

Golodoff’s “Attu Boy,” published by the National Park Service earlier this year, includes historical photographs, commentary by NPS Senior Cultural Anthropologist Rachel Mason and additional first person recollections from Attuans who have since passed away. It recently received the Alaska Historical Society’s annual award for Contributions to Alaska History.

The Japanese occupied two Alaska islands in World War II as part of a sprawling militar y action that included the pivotal Battle of Midway. A few Navy men were the sole inhabitants of Kiska, southeast of Attu. But Attu itself consisted entirely of civilians, mostly Alaska Natives.

In 1943, Attu Island became the scene of the bloodiest land battle in North America since the Civil War. Total losses of American and Japanese troops is calculated between 2,500 and 3,000 or more, a number on par with Pearl Harbor or the 9/11 terrorist attack.

Americans are even less aware of the wartime fate of Attu village and its people, something Golodoff wants to rectify.

As a child in Attu, Golodoff lived in a small, uninsulated home and, with his family, subsisted mostly on local fish and game. He spoke the island dialect of Unangan, the Aleut language; adults also spoke a mix of English and Russian. He picked up Japanese while interred but didn’t use English until after the war was over. He never graduated from high school, but admits to being an avid reader.

“In most of the books I have read about World War II in the Aleutian Islands, there is some truth, but there is a lot of dishonesty in the books. I know this because I have been through it,” he writes. “I’m talking about my own experiences so people will know what happened to me. I don’t remember everything about my childhood but I do remember well my experience during World War II.”

He recalls how the Japanese soldiers bunked in the Orthodox church and how a sentry gave him candy, how he accompanied his mother to dig clay while in Japan, how disease and hunger cut down the villagers one by one.

“I used to get a quarter of a bowl of watery rice a day and sometimes oats and water,” he writes. “The Attuan boys stole food at night.”

He remembers American planes dropping food to the POWs wh en the war ended and his first taste of Coca Cola.

The Japanese treated the Alaskans somewhat better than civilians taken from China or Korea, Mason says. But the Attuans nonetheless endured three and a half years of malnutrition, illness and, at times abuse at the hands of their captors.

Other Alaska Natives were treated almost as badly by their own government. After the capture of Attu, officials ordered Aleuts to internment camps in Southeast Alaska. Poor food, lack of heat in the wet, cold climate and inadequate medical care killed many.

When the war ended, some had no homes to return to. Soldiers had looted churches and towns. Whole villages had been dismantled by combatants.

Among the so called “lost villages” was Attu, leveled during the build up to the great battle. Today only a lonely memorial marks the old village site.
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